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Montecito Real estate for sale and rent

Homes, condos and land for sale and rent in Montecito, CA

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Montecito is a unincorporated census-designated place in Santa Barbara County, California.
It boasts some of the most spectacular and expensive real estate in the United States, particularly above East Valley Road for its perfect micro-climate along the coast.

According to the Montecito Community Plan, Montecito is bounded on the north by East Camino Cielo Road; on the east by Ortega Ridge Road and Ladera Lane (with Summerland on the east side of Ortega Hill Ln.); on the South by the Pacific Ocean, and to the west by Olive Mill Road. Montecito does not include areas such as Coast Village Road, which while usually considered part of Montecito, are actually within the city limits of Santa Barbara, located directly to the west. Montecito occupies the eastern portion of the coastal plain south of the Santa Ynez Mountains. Parts of the town are built on the lower foothills of the range. Notable roads spanning Montecito include East Valley Road, Mountain Drive, and Sycamore Canyon Road, all of which form part of State Route 192. In addition, the U.S. 101 freeway runs along the south end of town, connecting it with other cities in Santa Barbara County and the rest of Southern California.

Montecito has 3,010 single-family dwellings. The community is consistently ranked by Forbes magazine as one of the wealthiest communities in the United States.

The site of present-day Montecito, along with the entire south coast of Santa Barbara County, was inhabited for over 10,000 years by the Chumash Indians. The Spanish arrived in the 18th century, but left the region largely unsettled while they built the Presidio and Mission Santa Barbara farther west.

In the middle of the 19th century the area was known as a haven for bandits and highway robbers, who hid in the oak groves and canyons, preying on traffic on the coastal route between the towns that developed around the missions. By the end of the 1860s the bandit gangs were gone, and Italian settlers arrived. Finding an area reminiscent of Italy, they built farms and gardens similar to those they had left behind in Italy. Around the end of the 19th century, wealthy tourists from the eastern and midwestern United States began to buy land in the area. It was near enough to Santa Barbara for essential services while still being secluded. Desirable weather and several nearby hot springs offered the promise of comfortable, healthy living, in addition to the availability of affordable land.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 9.3 square miles (24 km2), 99.94% of it land and 0.06% of it water.
Montecito experiences a cool Mediterranean climate (Köppen climate classification Csb) characteristic of coastal Southern California. Because of Montecito’s proximity to the ocean, onshore breezes significantly moderate temperatures, resulting in warmer winters and cooler summers compared with places further inland. With its gentle Mediterranean climate, Montecito has long been a desirable location for nursery men and gifted horticulturists. March and April are the months to watch gray whales migrate north from Mexico through Santa Barbara Channel.
The 2010 United States Census[11] reported that Montecito had a population of 8,965. The population density was 967.7 people per square mile (373.6/km²). The racial makeup of Montecito was 8,267 (92.2%) White, 55 (0.6%) African American, 38 (0.4%) Native American, 218 (2.4%) Asian, 6 (0.1%) Pacific Islander, 156 (1.7%) from other races, and 225 (2.5%) from two or more races.
Hispanic or Latino of any race were 605 persons (6.7%).
The Census reported that 8,033 people (89.6% of the population) lived in households, 932 (10.4%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and none were institutionalized.

Of the 3,432 households, 831 (24.2%) had children under the age of 18 living in them; 1,936 (56.4%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 234 (6.8%) had a female householder with no husband present, 93 (2.7%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 110 (3.2%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 36 (1.0%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 941 households (27.4%) were made up of individuals and 527 (15.4%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.34. There were 2,263 families (65.9% of all households); the average family size was 2.79.

The age spread of the population accounts 1,515 people (16.9%) under the age of 18, 1,234 people (13.8%) aged 18 to 24, 1,169 people (13.0%) aged 25 to 44, 2,716 people (30.3%) aged 45 to 64, and 2,331 people (26.0%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 50.0 years. For every 100 females there were 87.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.9 males.

4,238 housing units represented an average density of 457.5 per square mile (176.6/km²), of which 2,522 (73.5%) were owner-occupied, and 910 (26.5%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 2.4%; the rental vacancy rate was 8.7%. 6,081 people (67.8% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 1,952 people (21.8%) lived in rental housing units.

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Goleta Real estate for sale and rent

Homes, condos and land for sale and rent in Goleta, CA

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Goleta is a city in southern Santa Barbara County, California, US. It was incorporated as a city in 2002, after a long period as the largest unincorporated, populated area in the county. As of the 2000 census, the Census-designated place (CDP) had a total population of 55,204, however, a significant portion of the census territory of 2000 did not incorporate into the new city. The population was 29,888 at the 2010 census.
It is known for being near the University of California, Santa Barbara campus, although the CDP of Isla Vista is closer to the campus.
The area of present-day Goleta was populated for thousands of years by the native Chumash people. Locally they became known by the Spanish as Canaliños because they lived along the coast adjacent to the Channel Islands. One of the largest villages, S’axpilil, was north of the Goleta Slough, not far from the present-day Santa Barbara Airport.

The first European visitor to the Goleta area was the Spanish mariner Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo, who spent time around the Channel Islands in 1542, and died there in 1543. During the 1980s, discovery of some 16th-century cannon on the beach led to the advancement of a theory that Sir Francis Drake sailed into the Goleta Slough in 1579. Goleta is one of many alternative locations (and the one farthest south) proposed for Drake’s “New Albion” – generally believed to be today’s Drake’s Bay, north of San Francisco.
In 1602, another sailing expedition, led by Sebastian Vizcaino, visited the California Coast. Vizcaino named the channel “Santa Barbara”. Spanish ships associated with the Manila Galleon trade probably stopped in the area intermittently during the next 167 years, but no permanent settlements were established.

An expedition in 1782, led by military governor Felipe de Neve, founded the Presidio of Santa Barbara and, soon thereafter, the Santa Barbara Mission. The Goleta area, along with most of the coastal areas of today’s Santa Barbara County, was placed in the jurisdiction of the presidio and mission.

Sometime after the De Anza expeditions, a sailing ship (“goleta”) was wrecked at the mouth of the lagoon, and remained visible for many years, giving the area its current name. After Mexico became independent of Spain in 1821, most of the former mission ranch lands were divided up into large grants. The Goleta area became part of two adjacent ranchos. To the east of today’s Fairview Avenue was Rancho La Goleta, named for the shipwreck and granted to Daniel A. Hill, the first American resident of Santa Barbara. An 1840s diseño (claim map) of the rancho shows the wrecked ship.

The parts of Goleta to the west of Fairview Avenue were in Rancho Dos Pueblos, granted in 1842 to Nicholas Den, son-in-law of Daniel Hill. Rancho Dos Pueblos included the lagoon, airport, UCSB and Isla Vista, extending to the west as far as the eastern boundary of today’s El Capitan State Beach.

Goleta is about 8 miles (13 km) west of the city of Santa Barbara, along the coast (the coast runs east to west in this portion of southern California). Nearby is the Santa Barbara campus of the University of California and the student community of Isla Vista.
According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 26.4 square miles (68 km2), of which 26.3 square miles (68 km2) are land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2) (0.38%) is water.
Goleta occupies the coastal plain between the Santa Ynez Mountains, the principal mountain range of southern Santa Barbara County, and the Pacific Ocean. The mountains form a scenic backdrop to the town, covered by chaparral and displaying prominent sandstone outcrops. The range exceeds 4,000 feet in height to the northwest of Goleta, at Broadcast and Santa Ynez Peaks. Sundowner winds occur in both Goleta and Santa Barbara.
Air quality in Goleta is generally good with low ozone concentrations.
Ellwood Mesa contains eucalyptus groves where monarch butterflies spend the winter.
The 2010 United States Census reported that Goleta had a population of 29,888. The population density was 3,747.9 people per square mile (1,447.1/km²). The racial makeup of Goleta was 20,833 (69.7%) White, 469 (1.6%) African American, 283 (0.9%) Native American, 2,728 (9.1%) Asian, 26 (0.1%) Pacific Islander, 4,182 (14.0%) from other races, and 1,367 (4.6%) from two or more races.
Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9,824 persons (32.9%).
The Census reported that 29,687 people (99.3% of the population) lived in households, 23 (0.1%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 178 (0.6%) were institutionalized.

There were 10,903 households, out of which 3,416 (31.3%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 5,265 (48.3%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 1,069 (9.8%) had a female householder with no husband present, 472 (4.3%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 659 (6.0%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 88 (0.8%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 2,732 households (25.1%) were made up of individuals and 1,090 (10.0%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.72. There were 6,806 families (62.4% of all households); the average family size was 3.23.

Schools:

The front entrance to Kellogg Elementary school, a school in Goleta.
Elementary:
– Brandon School (within City of Goleta)
– El Camino School
– Ellwood School (within City of Goleta)
– Foothill School
– Hollister School
– Isla Vista School
– Kellogg School (within City of Goleta)
– La Patera School (within City of Goleta)
– Mountain View School
– Goleta Family School
Secondary
– Goleta Valley Junior High
– Dos Pueblos High School[54]

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Carpinteria Real estate for sale and rent

Homes, condos and land for sale and rent in Carpinteria, CA

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Carpinteria is a small oceanside city located in southeastern Santa Barbara County, California, east of Santa Barbara and northwest of Ventura. The population was 13,040 at the 2010 census.
Carpinteria Beach is known for its gentle slope and calm waves in selected sandy areas but also good surfing swells in some of the more rocky areas. Seals and sea lions can be seen in the area December through May at the rookery in the nearby Carpinteria Bluffs, as well as an occasional gray whale. Tidepools contain starfish, sea anemones, crabs, snails, octopuses and sea urchins. A marathon-length round trip north of the rookery along the beach to Stearns Wharf in Santa Barbara is possible, though passable only during low tide. A popular campground is located adjacent to the beach. There is bird watching at Carpinteria Salt Marsh Reserve, established in 1977 and administered by the Natural Reserve System of the University of California. The Waldholme Torrey Pine, largest known Torrey pine tree on earth, is located in downtown Carpinteria.

Since 1987, the California Avocado Festival has been held in Carpinteria on the first weekend of October. The Santa Barbara Polo Club, one of the main equestrian polo fields in the country, is located in Carpinteria. The city is also home to Hollandia Produce, an organic produce company with 70 employees. lynda.com, an online software training company ranked as one of the fastest-growing private companies in the U.S. (according to Inc. magazine’s 2010 500|5000 company listing) had its headquarters in Carpinteria. The company was purchased by LinkedIn in 2015 for $1.5 billion.

In 1769, the Spanish Portola expedition came west along the beach from the previous night’s encampment at Rincon. The explorers found a large native village on the point of land where Carpinteria Pier is today. The party camped nearby on August 17. Fray Juan Crespi, a Franciscan missionary travelling with the expedition, noted that “Not far from the town we saw some springs of pitch. The Indians have many canoes, and at the time were building one, for which reason the soldiers named this town La Carpinteria” (the carpentry shop).
The Chumash people used the naturally occurring surface asphalt to seal their canoes, known as Tomols. Petroleum seeps are still visible along the beach bluffs at Tar Pits Park on the campground beach of Carpinteria State Beach. The three closest drilling platforms visible from the shore are within the Carpinteria Offshore Oil Field, the 50th-largest field in California.
Carpinteria is located several miles east of the city of Santa Barbara(the coast runs east to west in this section of California). Nearby is the unincorporated community of Summerland.
According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 9.2 square miles (24 km2), of which 2.6 square miles (6.7 km2) is land and 6.7 square miles (17 km2) (72.11%) is water.
The city is located almost entirely on a coastal plain in between the Santa Ynez Mountains and the Pacific Ocean. Immediately to the north of Carpinteria lie foothills and then the Santa Ynez Mountains. Between the foothills and the populated area of the city is an agricultural zone. The mountains provide a scenic backdrop to town, covered in chaparral and displaying prominent sandstone outcrops. Because of the well-ventilated nature of the air basin, ozone concentrations are low while air quality is high.
Carpinteria Beach is known for its gentle slope and calm waves in selected sandy areas but also good surfing swells in some of the more rocky areas.
The 2010 United States Census reported that Carpinteria had a population of 13,040. The population density was 1,406.5 people per square mile (543.1/km²). The racial makeup of Carpinteria was 9,348 (71.7%) White, Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6,351 persons (48.7%), 109 (0.8%) African American, 144 (1.1%) Native American, 296 (2.3%) Asian, 15 (0.1%) Pacific Islander, 2,599 (19.9%) from other races, and 529 (4.1%) from two or more races.
The Census reported that 13,021 people (99.9% of the population) lived in households, 19 (0.1%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 0 (0%) were institutionalized.

There were 4,759 households, out of which 1,510 (31.7%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 2,305 (48.4%) were married couples living together, 597 (12.5%) had a female householder with no husband present, 239 (5.0%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 293 (6.2%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 28 (0.6%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 1,203 households (25.3%) were made up of individuals and 525 (11.0%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.74. There were 3,141 families (66.0% of all households); the average family size was 3.23.

The city of Carpinteria is served by the Carpinteria Unified School District. It includes one high school, one middle (junior high) school, and four public elementary schools, one of which is an alternative school of choice (K-5). The district also has an alternative high school. Other schools include: Howard Carden School, a private preK – 7 elementary school, Carpinteria Christian School, a Baptist K-8 school, Cate School, a private preparatory school and Pacifica Graduate Institute, home of the Joseph Campbell and Marija Gimbutas Library. This graduate school offers master’s and PhD programs in depth psychology and mythology.

The Carpinteria Unified School District, which also includes the community of Summerland, and some outlying areas, includes the following:

– Carpinteria Middle (5351 Carpinteria Ave)
– Canalino Elementary (1480 Linden Ave)
– Aliso Elementary (4545 Carpinteria Ave)
– Carpinteria Family School (1480 Linden Ave)
– Summerland Elementary (135 Valencia Road)
– Carpinteria Senior High (4810 Foothill Rd)
– Rincon High (4698 Foothill Rd)
– Foothill Alternative High (4698 Foothill Rd)

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Santa Maria Real estate for sale and rent

Homes, condos and land for sale and rent in Santa Maria, CA

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Santa Maria is a city near the Southern California coast in Santa Barbara County. It is approximately 120 miles (190 km) northwest of Los Angeles (city limits). Its estimated 2014 population was 103,410, making it the most populous city in the county and the Santa Maria-Santa Barbara, CA Metro Area. The city is notable for its wine industry and Santa Maria-style barbecue. Sunset magazine called Santa Maria “The West’s Best BBQ Town”.
The Santa Maria Valley, stretching from the Santa Lucia Mountains toward the Pacific Ocean, was the homeland of the Chumash people for several thousand years. The Native Americans made their homes on the slopes of the surrounding hills among the oaks, on the banks of the Santa Maria River among the sycamores, and along the coast.
In 1769, the Portolá Expedition passed through the Santa Maria Valley during the first Spanish land exploration up the coast of Las Californias Province. Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa was established just north of the valley in 1772, and Mission La Purísima Concepción was established near present-day Lompoc in 1787.
In the late 19th century, after California gained statehood in 1850, the area’s rich soil attracted farmers and other settlers. By the end of the century, the Santa Maria River Valley had become one of the most productive agricultural areas in the state. Agriculture is still a key component of the economy for the city and the entire region.
Between 1869 and 1874, four of the valley’s settlers, Rudolph Cook, John Thornburg, Isaac Fesler (for whom Fesler Jr. High School is named), and Isaac Miller (for whom Miller Elementary School is named), built their homes near each other at the present corners on Broadway and Main Street. The townsite was recorded in Santa Barbara in 1875.
Oil exploration began in 1888, leading to large-scale discoveries at the turn of the 20th century. In 1902, Union Oil discovered the large Orcutt Oil Field in the Solomon Hills south of town, and a number of smaller companies also began pumping oil. Two years later, Union Oil had 22 wells in production. Other significant discoveries followed, including the Lompoc Oil Field in 1903 and the Cat Canyon field in 1908. Over the next 80 years more large oil fields were found, and thousands of oil wells drilled and put into production. Oil development intensified in 1930s, with the discovery of the Santa Maria Valley Oil Field in 1934, right underneath the southern and western parts of the city of Santa Maria, which spurred the city’s growth even further. By 1957 there were 1,775 oil wells in operation in the Santa Maria Valley, producing more than $640 million worth of oil.
According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 22.4 square miles (58 km2), of which, 22.8 square miles (59 km2) of it is land and 0.6 square miles (1.6 km2) of it (2.73%) is water.
Santa Maria is situated north of the unincorporated township of Orcutt, California, and south of the Santa Maria River (which serves as the line between Santa Barbara County and San Luis Obispo County). The valley is bordered on the west by the Pacific Ocean and to the east by the San Rafael Mountains and the Los Padres National Forest. The city of Guadalupe, California is approximately 9 miles (14 km) to the west of Santa Maria.
Santa Maria experiences a cool Mediterranean climate (Köppen climate classification Csb) typical of coastal areas of California north of Point Conception. The climate is mostly sunny, refreshed by the ocean breeze. Fog is common. Snow in the lowest parts of the city is virtually unknown, with the last brief flurry recorded in January 1949. The only recorded earlier snowfall was in January 1882. Rainfall averages 14 inches (360 mm) annually.
Agriculture plays an important role in the city’s economy. The Santa Maria area is home to an increasing number of vineyards, wineries and winemakers and is centrally located to both the Santa Ynez and Foxen Canyon areas of Santa Barbara County’s wine country, and San Luis Obispo County’s Edna Valley-Arroyo Grande wine country.
The agricultural areas surrounding the city are some of the most productive in California, with primary crops including strawberries, wine grapes, celery, lettuce, peas, squash, cauliflower, spinach, broccoli and beans. Many cattle ranchers also call the Santa Maria Valley home.
In recent years, other industries have been being added to the city’s agricultural and retail mix, including: aerospace; communications; high-tech research and development; energy production; military operations; and manufacturing. The petroleum industry has had a large presence in the area since oil was first discovered at the Orcutt Oil Field in 1902. By 1957 there were 1,775 oil wells in operation in the Santa Maria Valley, producing more than $640 million worth of oil.
The 2010 United States Census reported that Santa Maria had a population of 99,553. The population density was 4,255.3 people per square mile (1,643.0/km²). The racial makeup of Santa Maria was 55,983 (56.2%) White, 1,656 (1.7%) African American, 1,818 (1.8%) Native American, 5,054 (5.1%) Asian, 161 (0.2%) Pacific Islander, 29,841 (30.0%) from other races, and 5,040 (5.1%) from two or more races.
Hispanic or Latino of any race were 70,114 persons (70.4%).
The Census reported that 98,546 people (99.0% of the population) lived in households, 588 (0.6%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 419 (0.4%) were institutionalized.
There were 26,908 households, out of which 13,223 (49.1%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 14,616 (54.3%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 3,962 (14.7%) had a female householder with no husband present, 1,901 (7.1%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 1,754 (6.5%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 190 (0.7%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 5,079 households (18.9%) were made up of individuals and 2,431 (9.0%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.66. There were 20,479 families (76.1% of all households); the average family size was 4.06.
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Santa Barbara Real estate for sale and rent

Homes, condos and land for sale and rent in Santa Barbara, CA

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Santa Barbara (Spanish for “Saint Barbara”) is the county seat of Santa Barbara County in the U.S. state of California. Situated on a south-facing section of coastline, the longest such section on the West Coast of the United States, the city lies between the steeply rising Santa Ynez Mountains and the Pacific Ocean. Santa Barbara’s climate is often described as Mediterranean, and the city has been promoted as the “American Riviera”.
As of 2014, the city had an estimated population of 91,196, up from 88,410 in 2010, making it the second most populous city in the county after Santa Maria while the contiguous urban area, which includes the cities of Goleta and Carpinteria, along with the unincorporated regions of Isla Vista, Montecito, Mission Canyon, Hope Ranch, Summerland, and others, has an approximate population of 220,000. The population of the entire county in 2010 was 423,895.

The Santa Barbara County area, including the Northern Channel Islands, was first settled by Native Americans at least 13,000 years ago. Evidence for a Paleoindian presence has been found in the form of a fluted Clovis-like point found in the 1980s along the western Santa Barbara Coast, as well as the remains of Arlington Springs Man found on Santa Rosa Island in the 1960s. For thousands of years, the area was home to the Chumash tribe of Native Americans, complex hunter-gatherers who lived along the coast and in interior valleys leaving rock art in many locations including Painted Cave.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 3,789 square miles (9,810 km2), of which 2,735 square miles (7,080 km2) is land and 1,054 square miles (2,730 km2) (27.8%) is water. Four of the Channel Islands – San Miguel Island, Santa Cruz Island, Santa Rosa Island and Santa Barbara Island – are in Santa Barbara County. They form the largest part of the Channel Islands National Park (which also includes Anacapa Island in Ventura County).
Santa Barbara’s ecology is similar to that of most of Southern California. The apex predator is the American black bear, with the cougar and coyote the main competing predators. They, along with the bobcats, have an effect on the local deer population. Foxes may hunt smaller mammals. Many whales, sharks, dolphins, and sea lions roam the local waters.
Santa Barbara experiences a warm-summer Mediterranean climate characteristic of coastal California. Because the city lies along the ocean, onshore breezes moderate temperatures resulting in warmer winters and cooler summers compared with places farther inland. In the winter, storms reach California, some of which bring heavy rainfall. Local rainfall totals can be enhanced by orographic lift when storms are accompanied by southerly flow pushing moist air over the Santa Ynez mountains, producing greater rainfall than in other coastal areas. Summers in Southern California are mostly rainless due to the presence of a high-pressure area over the eastern Pacific. In the fall, downslope winds, locally called “Sundowners”, can raise temperatures into the high 90s and drop humidities into the single digits, increasing the chance and severity of wildfires in the foothills north of the city. Annual rainfall totals are highly variable and in exceptional years like 1940–1941 and 1997–1998 over 40 inches (1.0 m) of rain have fallen in a year, but in dry seasons less than 6 inches (150 mm) is not unheard of. Snow sometimes covers higher elevations of the Santa Ynez Mountains but is extremely rare in the city itself. The most recent accumulating snow to fall near sea level was in January 1949, when approximately two inches fell in the city.
The first Monterey-style adobe in California was built on State Street of Santa Barbara by the wealthy merchant Alpheus Thompson. The dominant architectural themes of Santa Barbara are the Spanish Colonial Revival and the related Mission Revival style, encouraged through design guidelines adopted by city leaders after the 1925 earthquake destroyed much of the downtown commercial district. Residential architectural styles in Santa Barbara reflect the era of their construction. Many late 1800s Victorian homes remain downtown and in the “Upper East” neighborhood. California bungalows are common, built in the early decades of the 20th century. Spanish Colonial Revival-style homes built after 1925 are common all over the city, especially in newer upscale residential areas like Montecito and Hope Ranch.
The 2010 United States Census reported that Santa Barbara had a population of 88,410. The population density was 2,106.6 people per square mile (813.4/km²). The racial makeup of Santa Barbara was 66,411 (75.1%) White, 1,420 (1.6%) African American, 892 (1.0%) Native American, 3,062 (3.5%) Asian (1.0% Chinese, 0.6% Filipino, 0.5% Japanese, 0.4% Korean, 0.4% Indian, 0.2% Vietnamese, 0.4% other), 116 (0.1%) Pacific Islander, 13,032 (14.7%) from other races, and 3,477 (3.9%) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 33,591 persons (38.0%). Non-Hispanic Whites were 45,852 persons (52.2%).
The Census reported that 86,783 people (98.2% of the population) lived in households, 1,172 (1.3%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 455 (0.5%) were institutionalized.
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Homes for sale in Westwood, Century City (Los Angeles), CA

Homes and condos for sale and rent in Westwood & Century City, LA

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Westwood
Westwood is a commercial and residential neighborhood in the northern central portion of the Westside region of Los Angeles, California. It is the home of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).
The 2000 census found that the forty-seven thousand people living in the neighborhood were generally young and moderately diverse ethnically, with a generally high level of income and education.
The neighborhood was developed after 1919, with a new campus of the University of California being built and opened in 1926. Other attractions besides the UCLA campus include Westwood Village, with its historic motion picture theaters, restaurants and shopping, Westwood Village Memorial Park Cemetery and the Hammer Museum. Holmby Hills is considered one of the wealthiest residential areas in Los Angeles, and the Geffen Playhouse attracts theater-goers. A Mormon temple is also prominent.
There are several elementary schools and one middle school in the neighborhood.

Century City
Century City is a 176-acre (71.2 ha) neighborhood and business district in Los Angeles’ Westside. Outside of Downtown Los Angeles, Century City is one of the metropolitan area’s most prominent employment centers, and its skyscrapers form a distinctive skyline on the Westside.
The district was developed on the former backlot of film studio 20th Century Fox, and its first building was opened in 1963. There are two private schools, but no public schools in the neighborhood. Important to the economy are the Westfield Century City shopping center, business towers, and Fox Studios.

Westwood
Westwood Village was created by the Janss Investment Company, run by Harold and Edwin Janss and their father, Peter, in the late 1920s as an autonomous shopping district and headquarters of the Janss Company.
By 1999, the Village was considered to be upscale economically, and today it houses many small and large shops and restaurants. Though some of the restaurants are independently owned, most of the Westwood’s establishments are now chain stores. Historically, independent merchants have blamed poor sales on lack of parking; a city-owned garage, on Broxton Ave, provides two hours of free parking for patrons entering before 6 pm, and $3 flat rate parking from 6 pm to close (typically midnight on weeknights and 3 am on weekends). Parking is still cited as a problem.

Century City
In 1956, Spyros Skouras (1893-1971), who served as the President of 20th Century Fox from 1942-62, and his nephew-in-law Edmond Herrscher (died 1983), an attorney sometimes known as “the father of Century City,” decided to repurpose the land for real estate development. The following year, in 1957, they commissioned a master-plan development from Welton Becket Associates, which was unveiled at a major press event on the “western” backlot later that year.
In 1961, after Fox suffered a string of expensive flops, culminating with the financial strain put on the studio by the very expensive production of Cleopatra, the film studio sold about 180 acres (0.73 km2) to developer William Zeckendorf and Aluminum Co. of America, also known as Alcoa, for US$300 million (US$2.4 billion in 2014’s money). Herrscher had encouraged his uncle-in-law to borrow money instead, but once Skouras refused, he was out of the picture.
The new owners conceived Century City as “a city within a city”. In 1963, the first building, Gateway West Building, was completed. The next year, in 1964, Minoru Yamasaki designed the Century Plaza Hotel. Five years later, in 1969, architects Anthony J. Lumsden and César Pelli designed the Century City Medical Plaza.

The 2010 U.S. census counted 47,916 residents in the 3.68-square-mile Westwood neighborhood—or 13,036 people per square mile, an average population density for the city. In 2008, the city estimated that the population had increased to 52,041. The median age for residents was 27, considered young for the city; the percentages of residents aged 19 to 34 was among the county’s highest.

The neighborhood was considered moderately diverse ethnically, with a high percentage of Asians and of whites. The breakdown was whites, 62.9%; Asians, 23.1%; Latinos, 7.0%; blacks, 2.0%; and others, 4.9%. Iran (23.5%) and Taiwan (7.3%) were the most common places of birth for the 31.3% of the residents who were born abroad—about the same percentage as in the city at large.

The median yearly household income in 2008 dollars was $68,716, a high figure for Los Angeles. The percentages of households that earned $125,000 yearly and higher or that earned $20,000 or less were high for Los Angeles County. The average household size of two people was low for Los Angeles. Renters occupied 64.1% of the housing stock and house- or apartment owners held 35.9%. The percentages of never-married men and women were among the county’s highest. In 2000 there were 309 families headed by single parents, a low percentage for the city. Five percent of the population had served in the military, a low figure for both the city and the county.

Westwood
According to the Westwood Neighborhood Council, the Westwood Homeowners Association, and the Los Angeles Times’ Mapping L.A. project, Westwood’s street and other boundaries are north, Sunset Boulevard; east, Beverly Hills city limits (to include the Los Angeles Country Club); south, Santa Monica Boulevard; and west, the San Diego Freeway (excluding the federal Veterans Administration grounds).
Westwood is flanked on the north by Beverly Crest, on the east by Beverly Hills, on the southeast by Century City, on the south by West Los Angeles, on the west by Veterans Administration and Brentwood and on the northwest by Bel-Air. The southern portion of Holmby Hills is also part of the Westwood district.

Century City
According to the Mapping L.A. project of the Los Angeles Times, Century City is bordered on the northeast and east by Beverly Hills, on the southeast and south by Cheviot Hills, on the southwest and west by West Los Angeles and on the northwest by Westwood.

Westwood
Sixty-six percent of Westwood residents aged 25 and older had earned a four-year degree by 2000, a high figure for both the city and the county. The percentages of residents of that age with a master’s degree or higher was the third-highest in the county.
The Los Angeles Unified School District operates public schools.

Schools in Westwood are:

  • Fairburn Avenue Elementary School, LAUSD, 1403 Fairburn Avenue
  • Warner Avenue Elementary School, LAUSD, 615 Holmby Avenue
  • Sinai Akiba Academy, private elementary, 10400 Wilshire Boulevard
  • Saint Paul the Apostle, private elementary, 1536 Selby Avenue
  • Ralph Waldo Emerson Middle School, LAUSD, 1660 Selby Avenue

The zoned senior high school is University High School in West Los Angeles.
UCLA Lab School Corinne A. Seeds Campus, formerly the Corinne A. Seeds University Elementary School and renamed in 2009, is the University of California, Los Angeles laboratory school.

Century City
Fifty-five percent of Century City residents aged 25 or over had earned a four-year degree by 2000, a high figure for Los Angeles.
Los Angeles Unified School District is the school district of Century City.
Three private schools are located within the Century City neighborhood — VINCI Academy Daycare & Preschool, at 1940 Century Park East; Lycée Français de Los Angeles, at 10361 Pico Boulevard; and Temple Isaiah Preschool and Kindergarten, at 10345 West PIco Boulevard.

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Homes for sale in Westchester (Los Angeles), CA

Homes, condos and land for sale and rent in Westchester, LA

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Westchester is a neighborhood that straddles Los Angeles and the Westside Region of Los Angeles County, California. The neighborhood is part of the city of Los Angeles and is known for its secluded character.
It is the home of Loyola Marymount University, the Otis College of Art and Design, and Westchester Enriched Sciences Magnet Schools, formerly Westchester High School. Two notable examples of Googie-style architecture are located within the community. The Los Angeles International Airport takes up the southwestern portion of Westchester territory.
A total of 39,480 people lived in Westchester’s 10.81 square miles, according to the 2010 U.S. census, and that figure included the uninhabited acreage of the Los Angeles International Airport—resulting in a density of 3,652 people per square mile, among the lowest population densities in the city of Los Angeles but about average for the county. The median age was 35.6, about average for Los Angeles city. The percentage of people from age 19 through 34 was among the county’s highest.

In 2010 whites made up 61.1% of the population, blacks were at 14.2%, Asians at 12.0%, Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander 0.3%, and others (including two or more races) at 11.9%. Those who identified themselves as Hispanic or Latino (of any race) were 18.2%.

In 2010, the mean family income (dollars) for the area was $135,026 and the median family income (dollars) was $106,302, both numbers high for the city.[18] The percentages of families that earned more than $100,000 a year was 53.5%. Renters occupied 48.2% of the housing units, and homeowners occupied the rest. The average household size was 2.3 people, considered low for the city and county. The percentages of divorced men (8.6%) and divorced women (11.9%) were among the county’s highest.
The 2,000 census counted 3,055 military veterans, 9.2% of the population, considered a high percentage for the city of Los Angeles but about average for the county.

The main part of Westchester is flanked by Playa Vista and Culver City on the north, Inglewood and Lennox on the east, Del Aire and El Segundo on the south and Playa del Rey on the west. It includes all of the Los Angeles International Airport. There is also a two-block-wide shoestring district that runs from the intersection of Centinela Avenue and La Cienega Boulevard north to 63rd Street and then east to Overhill Avenue, where it links with the Hyde Park neighborhood.
The main neighborhood’s boundary lines are, generally, on the east: north-south on La Cienega Boulevard or the Inglewood city line; on the south: east-west on the city boundary with El Segundo or Imperial Highway; on the west: north-south on Pershing Drive and Westchester Parkway, then roughly north-south on a series of residential streets west of Westchester High School to the Playa Vista neighborhood.

About 51.7% of Westchester’s residents had completed a bachelor’s degree or higher by 2010, a high figure when compared with the city and the county at large. The percentage of the residents who held a master’s degree or a doctorate was high for the county.

Postsecondary schools:

  • Loyola Marymount University, 1 LMU Drive
  • Otis College of Art and Design, 9045 Lincoln Boulevard
  • Pepperdine University West Los Angeles Campus, 6100 Center Drive

Secondary and elementary schools:

  • Westchester Enriched Sciences Magnet Schools, LAUSD secondary, 2400 West Manchester Avenue
  • The Incubator School, LAUSD, 7400 West Manchester Avenue
  • Westchester-Emerson Community Adult School, LAUSD, 8810 Emerson Avenue
  • Carousel, private K-12 special education, 7899 La Tijera Boulevard
  • Carousel–Airport Boulevard, private K-12, 8333 Airport Boulevard
  • Orville Wright Middle School, 6550 West 80th Street
  • St. Jerome Elementary School, private, 5580 Thornburn Street
  • Cowan Avenue Elementary School, LAUSD, 7615 Cowan Avenue
  • Westchester Lutheran School, private, 7831 Sepulveda Boulevard
  • Open Charter Magnet School, LAUSD, 5540 West 77th Street
  • Westport Heights Elementary School, LAUSD, 6011 West 79th Street
  • Kentwood Elementary School, LAUSD, 8401 Emerson Street
  • St. Anastasia Elementary School, private, 8631 South Stanmoor Drive
  • Visitation Elementary School, private, 8740 South Emerson Avenue
  • Loyola Village Elementary School, LAUSD, 8821 Villanova Avenue

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Homes for sale in Mid-Wilshire (Los Angeles), CA

Homes, condos and land for sale and rent in Mid-Wilshire, LA

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Mid-Wilshire is a densely populated residential neighborhood in the central region of Los Angeles, California. Its commercial and public-use areas also make it the site of museums and research centers and of widely known shopping districts and restaurants. Mid-Wilshire is notable as the most diverse neighborhood or city in Los Angeles County, containing an almost even proportion of whites, Asians, Hispanics and blacks.
Mid-Wilshire is the home to three secondary schools, an adult school, and seven other schools. A city park is dedicated to the memory of World War I servicemen. There is a hospital and medical center in the neighborhood’s southwest corner.
The 2000 U.S. Census counted 41,683 residents in the 2.78-square-mile neighborhood—an average of 14,988 people per square mile, among the highest population densities for the city and the county. In 2008 the city estimated that the population had increased to 47,176. The median age for residents was 34, about the city’s average.
Mid-Wilshire was said to be “highly diverse” when compared to the city at large. The ethnic breakdown in 2000 was whites, 33.6%; blacks, 22.7%; Latinos, 19.9%; Asians, 19.8%; and others, 3.9%. Mexico (16.1%) and Korea (24%) were the most common places of birth for the 25.1% of the residents who were born abroad, a figure that was considered average for the city as a whole.
The median household income in 2008 dollars was $58,483, average for Los Angeles. The average household size of 2.1 people was low for Los Angeles. Renters occupied 78.3% of the housing units, and home- or apartment owners the rest.

Mid-Wilshire is flanked by Fairfax, Hancock Park and Windsor Square to the north, Koreatown, and Arlington Heights to the east, Mid-City to the south and Mid-City West, Carthay and Beverly Grove to the west.
The neighborhood is bounded on the north by West Third Street, on the northeast by La Brea Avenue and Wilshire Boulevard, on the east by Crenshaw Boulevard, on the south by Pico Boulevard and on the west by Fairfax Avenue.
The Mid-Wilshire neighborhood includes:
Little Ethiopia
Little Ethiopia is a block-long stretch of Fairfax Avenue, part of the P.I.C.O. Neighborhood Council, northeast of the Crestview neighborhood, northwest of the Picfair Village district, east of the Carthay Square district and west of Wilshire Vista district. The area has a high concentration of Ethiopian businesses and restaurants, as well as a significant concentration of residents of Ethiopian and Eritrean ancestry.
Miracle Mile
Miracle Mile is a 1.5-mile (2.4 km) stretch of Wilshire Boulevard between Fairfax and Highland Avenues. In the early 1920s, Wilshire Boulevard west of Western Avenue was an unpaved farm road, extending through dairy farms and bean fields. Developer A. W. Ross saw potential for the area and developed Wilshire as a commercial district to rival downtown Los Angeles.
Oxford Square
Oxford Square is an historic neighborhood which, according to the Oxford Square Neighborhood Association, lies between Pico Boulevard and Olympic Boulevard and includes both sides of Victoria Avenue and South Windsor Boulevard.
Park La Brea
Park La Brea is an apartment complex bounded by 3rd Street on the north, Cochran Avenue on the east, Sixth Street on the south and Fairfax Avenue on the west. With 4,255 units located in eighteen 13-story towers and 31 two-story “garden apartment buildings,” it is the largest housing development in the United States west of the Mississippi River.
Park Mile
Park Mile is a commercial strip that lies along Wilshire Boulevard between Highland Avenue on the west, Wilton Place on the east, Sixth Street on the north and Eighth Street on the south.
Wilshire Vista
Wilshire Vista is an area north of Pico Boulevard near La Brea Avenue which for a long time was typically African-American but which around 2001 became more varied in ethnic composition with the arrival of young families and single professionals.

Mid-Wilshire residents aged 25 and older holding a four-year degree amounted to 45.2% of the population in 2000, a high rate for both the city and the county. The percentage of residents with a master’s degree was also high.
As Mid-Wilshire is an neighborhood of the City of Los Angeles, public facilities are provided by city departments: the Department of Recreation and Parks and the Los Angeles Public Library. Public schools are part of the Los Angeles Unified School District, The schools operating within Mid-Wilshire are:

  • Los Angeles Senior High School, LAUSD, 4650 West Olympic Boulevard
  • Yeshiva Gedolah of Los Angeles, private high school, 5444 West Olympic Boulevard
  • Shalhevet School, private K-12, 910 South Fairfax Avenue
  • Los Angeles Community Adult School, 4650 West Olympic Boulevard
  • Hancock Park Elementary School, LAUSD, 408 South Fairfax Avenue
  • New Los Angeles Charter School, private middle, 1919 South Burnside Avenue
  • Cathedral Chapel Elementary School, private, 755 South Cochran Avenue
  • Westside Jewish Community Center. private elementary, 5870 West Olympic Boulevard
  • Wilshire Crest Elementary School, LAUSD, 5241 West Olympic Boulevard
  • Queen Anne Place Elementary School, LAUSD, 1212 Queen Anne Place
  • Rejoyce in Jesus Christian School, private, 1304 South Cochran Avenue

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Homes for sale in Mid-City (Los Angeles), CA

Homes, condos and land for sale and rent in Mid-City, LA

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Mid-City is a highly diverse, very dense urban neighborhood in Central Los Angeles, California, with renters occupying most of the housing space but also with notable districts composed of historic single-family homes.
Attractions include restaurants and a post office named for singer Ray Charles, who had his recording studio in Mid-City. The neighborhood hosts eleven public and private schools. A north-south light-rail line is proposed for the area.
The 2000 U.S. census counted 52,197 residents in the 3.47-square-mile neighborhood—an average of 15,051 people per square mile, among the highest population densities in Los Angeles County. In 2008, the city estimated that the population had increased to 55,016. The median age for residents was 31, about average for both the city and the county.
Mid-City was said to be “highly diverse” when compared to the city at large, with a diversity index of 0.637. The ethnic breakdown in 2000 was: Latinos, 45.2%; blacks, 38.3%; whites, 9.5%; Asians, 3.9%; and others, 3.1%. Mexico (46) and El Salvador (15.6%) were the most common places of birth for the 35.1% of the residents who were born abroad, a figure that was considered average for the city and county.

The median household income in 2008 dollars was $43,711, considered average for the city. The percentage of households earning $20,000 or less was high, compared to the county at large. The average household size of 2.8 people was just about average for Los Angeles. Renters occupied 68.9% of the housing units, and home- or apartment owners the rest.
The percentages of never-married men (43.2%) and never-married women (35%) were among the county’s highest. The census found 2,748 families headed by single parents, the 23.4% rate being considered high for both the city and the county.

Mid-City is flanked by Carthay and Mid-Wilshire to the north, Arlington Heights to the east, Culver City and West Adams to the south, Palms to the southwest, Beverlywood to the west and Pico-Robertson to the northwest. The neighborhood is bounded on the north by Pico Boulevard, on the east by Crenshaw Boulevard, on the south by the Santa Monica Freeway, on the southwest by Washington and National boulevards, on the west by Robertson Boulevard and on the northwest by Cadillac Avenue and La Cienega Boulevard.
Smaller named areas within the Mid-City neighborhood are Brookside, Crestview, Fremont Place, Lafayette Square, Little Ethiopia, Picfair Village, Wellington Square, and Victoria Park.

Mid-city residents aged 25 and older holding a four-year degree amounted to 16.8% of the population in 2000, about average for both the city and the county.
These are the elementary or secondary schools within the neighborhood’s boundaries:

  • Hamilton High School, 2955 Robertson Boulevard, which opened in fall 1931, with Thomas Hughes Elson as the principal. At the time, its attendance boundaries included Culver City and in 1932 they extended as far north as Mulholland Highway.
  • Saturn Street Elementary School, 5360 Saturn Street
  • Alta Loma Elementary School, 1745 Vineyard Avenue
  • Shenandoah Street Elementary School, 2450 Shenandoah Street
  • Futuro College Preparatory Elementary School, LAUSD charter, 3838 Rosemead Avenue
  • Crescent Heights Boulevard Elementary School, alternative school, 1661 South Crescent Heights Boulevard
  • Los Angeles Center for Enriched Studies, alternative school, 5931 West 18th Street

Private schools

  • Pico Elementary School, 4436 West Pico Boulevard
  • Holy Spirit Elementary School, 1418 South Burnside Avenue
  • Play Mountain Place, 6063 Hargis Street
  • Donna Ro School, private, 4946 West 20th Street
As part of their long-range plans, the Los Angeles County MTA has proposed the Metro Crenshaw Line, which would place a rail transit stop in Mid-City. The proposed rail stop is at the intersection of Pico and San Vicente Boulevards—site of the old Vineyard Junction. That same intersection was a former rail stop of the Pacific Electric Red Car lines more than 50 years ago.
The Pacific Electric Red Car lines heading west from downtown Los Angeles diverged at Vineyard Junction. One line continued on to Beverly Hills, while the other went out to Venice Beach. The old Vineyard Junction site is now occupied by the end terminal for the Santa Monica Big Blue Bus.
The Crenshaw Light Rail Line would allow Mid-City residents to easy access to the city’s east/west rail lines: the Purple Line along Wilshire Boulevard, the Expo Line from Downtown Los Angeles to Culver City, and the Green Line from Norwalk to Redondo Beach.
Currently, the Mid-City alignment is unfunded, and part of the Crenshaw Corridor’s “Northern Feasibility Study”.

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Homes for sale in Hollywood (Los Angeles), CA

Homes, condos and land for sale and rent in Hollywood, LA

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Hollywood is a neighborhood in the central region of Los Angeles, California. The neighborhood is notable for its place as the home of the U.S. film industry, including several of its historic studios. Its name has come to be a metonym for the motion picture industry of the United States. Hollywood is also a highly ethnically diverse, densely populated, economically diverse neighborhood and retail business district.
The 2000 U.S. census counted 77,818 residents in the 3.51-square-mile (9.1 km2) Hollywood neighborhood—an average of 22,193 people per square mile (8,569 per km2), the seventh-densest neighborhood in all of Los Angeles County. In 2008 the city estimated that the population had increased to 85,489. The median age for residents was 31, about the city’s average.

Hollywood was said to be “highly diverse” when compared to the city at large. The ethnic breakdown in 2000 was: Latino or Hispanic, 42.2%, Non-Hispanic Whites, 41%; Asian, 7.1%; blacks, 5.2%, and others, 4.5%. Mexico (21.3%) and Guatemala (13%) were the most common places of birth for the 53.8% of the residents who were born abroad, a figure that was considered high for the city as a whole.

The median household income in 2008 dollars was $33,694, considered low for Los Angeles. The average household size of 2.1 people was also lower than the city norm. Renters occupied 92.4% of the housing units, and home- or apartment owners the rest.
The percentages of never-married men (55.1%), never-married women (39.8%) and widows (9.6%) were among the county’s highest. There were 2,640 families headed by single parents, about average for Los Angeles.

According to the Mapping L.A. project of the Los Angeles Times, Hollywood is flanked by Hollywood Hills to the north, Los Feliz to the northeast, East Hollywood to the east, Larchmont and Hancock Park to the south, Fairfax to the southwest, West Hollywood to the west and Hollywood Hills West to the northwest.
Street limits of the Hollywood neighborhood are: north, Hollywood Boulevard from La Brea Avenue to the east boundary of Wattles Garden Park and Franklin Avenue between Bonita and Western avenues; east, Western Avenue; south, Melrose Avenue, and west, La Brea Avenue or the West Hollywood city line.
Other areas within Hollywood are Franklin Village, Little Armenia, Spaulding Square, Thai Town and Yucca Corridor.

Hollywood residents aged 25 and older holding a four-year degree amounted to 28% of the population in 2000, about the same as in the county at large.
Schools in Hollywood include:

  • Temple Israel of Hollywood Day School, private, 7300 Hollywood Boulevard
  • Gardner Street Elementary School, LAUSD, 7450 Hawthorne Avenue
  • Selma Avenue Elementary School, LAUSD, 6611 Selma Avenue
  • Grant Elementary School, 1530 North Wilton Place
  • Young Hollywood, private elementary, 1547 North McCadden Place
  • Hollywood High School, LAUSD, 1521 North Highland Avenue
  • Hollywood Community Adult School, LAUSD, 1521 North Highland Avenue
  • Blessed Sacrament School, private elementary, 6641 Sunset Boulevard
  • Helen Bernstein High School, LAUSD, 1309 North Wilton Place
  • Richard A. Alonzo Community Day School, LAUSD, 5755 Fountain Avenue
  • Beverly Hills RC School, private elementary, 6550 Fountain Avenue
  • Hollywood Schoolhouse, private elementary, 1233 North McCadden Place
  • Joseph LeConte Middle School, LAUSD, 1316 North Bronson Avenue
  • T.C.A. Arshag Dickranian School, private K-12, 1200 North Cahuenga Boulevard
  • Hollywood Primary Center, LAUSD elementary, 1115 Tamarind Avenue
  • Santa Monica Boulevard Community Charter School, 1022 North Van Ness Avenue
  • Vine Street Elementary School, LAUSD, 955 North Vine Street
  • Hubert Howe Bancroft Middle School, LAUSD, 929 North Las Palmas Avenue
  • Larchmont Charter School, elementary, 815 North El Centro Avenue
  • Cheder Menachem, private elementary, 1606 South La Cienega Boulevard

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