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Homes and condos for sale in Downtown Los Angeles, CA

Homes, condos and land for sale and rent in Downtown, LA

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Downtown Los Angeles is the central business district of Los Angeles, California, as well as a diverse residential neighborhood of some 50,000 people. A 2013 study found that the district is home to over 500,000 jobs.
A heritage of the city’s founding in 1781, Downtown Los Angeles today is composed of different areas ranging from a fashion district to a skid row, and it is the hub of the city’s Metro rapid transit system. Banks, department stores and movie palaces at one time drew residents and visitors into the area, but the district declined economically and suffered a downturn for decades until its recent renaissance starting in the early 2000s: Old buildings are being modified for new uses, and skyscrapers have been built. Downtown Los Angeles is known for its government buildings, parks, theaters and other public places.
The 2000 U.S. census found that just 27,849 residents lived in the 5.84 square miles of Downtown—or 4,770 people per square mile, among the lowest densities for the city of Los Angeles but about average for the county. The population increased to 34,811 by 2008, according to city estimates. As of 2014 the population of the district had grown to 52,400 residents, and 5200 residential units were under construction. The median age for residents was 39, considered old for the city and the county.

Downtown Los Angeles is almost evenly balanced among the four major racial and ethnic groups – Asian Americans (23%), African Americans (22%), Latinos (25%) and non-Hispanic Whites (26%), according to an analysis of 2010 census data made by Loyola Marymount University researchers.

A study of the 2000 census showed that Downtown was the second-most diverse neighborhood in Los Angeles, its diversity index being 0.743, outrated only by Mid-Wilshire. The ethnic breakdown in 2000 was: Latinos, 36.7%; blacks, 22,3%; Asians, 21.3%; whites, 16.2%, and others, 3.5%. Mexico (44.7%) and Korea (17%) were the most common places of birth for the 41.9% of the residents who were born abroad, about the same ratio as in the city as a whole.

Downtown Los Angeles is flanked by Echo Park to the north and northwest, Chinatown to the northeast, Boyle Heights to the east, Vernon to the south, Historic South Central and University Park to the southwest and Pico-Union and Westlake to the west.
Downtown is bounded on the northeast by Cesar Chavez Avenue, on the east by the Los Angeles River, on the south by the Los Angeles city line with Vernon, on the southwest by East Washington Boulevard and on the west by the 110 Freeway or Beaudry Avenue, including the entire Four Level Interchange with Highway 101.

Downtown residents aged 25 and older holding a four-year degree amounted to 17.9% of the population in 2000, about average in the city and the county, but there was a high percentage of residents with less than a high school diploma.

These are the elementary or secondary schools within the neighborhood’s boundaries:

  • Ramon C. Cortines School of Visual and Performing Arts, LAUSD high school, 450 North Grand Avenue
  • Downtown Business High School, LAUSD alternative, 1081 West Temple Street
  • California Academy for Liberal Studies Early College High School, LAUSD charter, 700 Wilshire Boulevard
  • Alliance Dr. Olga Mohan High School, LAUSD charter, 644 West 17th Street
  • Abram Friedman Occupational School, LAUSD adult education, 1646 South Olive Street
  • Metropolitan Continuation School, LAUSD, 727 South Wilson Street
  • Para Los Ninos Middle School, LAUSD charter, 1617 East Seventh Street
  • Jardin de la Infancia, LAUSD charter elementary, 307 East Seventh Street
  • Saint Malachy Catholic Elementary School, private, 1200 East 81st Street
  • Tri-C Community Day School, LAUSD, 716 East 14th Street
  • City of Angels, LAUSD alternative school, 1449 South San Pedro Street (formerly Central High School)
  • San Pedro Street Elementary School, LAUSD, 1635 South San Pedro Street
  • Saint Turibius Elementary School, private, 1524 Essex Street
  • American University Preparatory School, private, 345 South Figueroa Street

The Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising is at 800 South Hope Street, and the Colburn School for music and the performing arts is at 200 South Grand Avenue

  • The Metro Expo Line was built in two phases and completed in 2016. The first phase of the project connected 7th Street/Metro Center Station downtown with Culver City via the former Pacific Electric Railway Santa Monica Air Line right-of-way. The second phase extended the line to Santa Monica. The Expo Line shares tracks with the Metro Blue Line north of Washington Boulevard, and shares both the Pico Station and 7th Street/Metro Center Station with the Blue Line.
  • Los Angeles Union Station is set to be a major stop on the under-construction California High-Speed Rail system, though it will not be a part of the project’s Initial Operating Segment. The project would connect Northern and Southern California via the San Joaquin Valley, with service averaging 220 miles per hour (350 km/h).
  • Under construction as of June 2016, the Regional Connector Transit Corridor will connect the Blue, Expo, and Gold Lines between the Little Tokyo/Arts District (which will be renamed “1st Street/Central”) and 7th Street/Metro Center stations.
  • Work is planned to bring streetcar-style trolley service to Downtown Los Angeles via Broadway, connecting the L.A. Live development with the Grand Avenue cultural corridor and Bunker Hill.

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Homes for sale in Del Rey (Los Angeles), CA

Homes, condos and land for sale and rent in Del Rey, LA

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Del Rey is a highly diverse neighborhood in the Westside of Los Angeles, surrounded on three sides by Culver City, California. Within it lie a police station, a middle school and six other schools. It is served by a neighborhood council and a residents association. Del Rey, with a 32,000+ population, has a large number of military veterans.
According to the Neighborhood Council Area Map, Del Rey is organized in eight areas ranging from Area A through H and surrounded on the northwest, north, northeast and east by Culver City, on the southeast by Playa Vista, on the southwest and west by Marina del Rey and on the northwest by Venice. Its southern apex touches the northeast corner of Playa del Rey.
Street and other boundaries are: the Culver City line on the northwest, north, east and southeast, Ballona Creek on the southeast and Lincoln Boulevard on the southwest. The western apex of Del Rey is at the corner of Lincoln and Washington boulevards.
The 2000 U.S. census counted 28,010 residents in the 2.45-square-mile Del Rey neighborhood—an average of 11,420 people per square mile, about the norm for Los Angeles; in 2008, the city estimated that the population had increased to 32,976. The median age for residents was 35, considered the average for Los Angeles; the percentage of residents aged 19 through 34 was among the county’s highest.

The neighborhood was highly diverse ethnically. The breakdown was Latinos, 44.3%; whites, 34.0%; Asians, 14.1%; blacks, 4.4%, and others, 3.2%. Mexico (53.3%) and the Philippines (7.0%) were the most common places of birth for the 37.9% of the residents who were born abroad—about an average figure for Los Angeles.
The median yearly household income in 2008 dollars was $62,259, an average figure for Los Angeles. The average household size of 2.5 people was about the same as the city as a whole. Renters occupied 55.2% of the housing stock and house- or apartment owners held 44.8%.
The percentages of never-married men (42.9%) and divorced women (12.7%) were among the county’s highest. In 2000, there were 1,846 veterans, or 8.4%, a high rate for Los Angeles.

Thirty percent of Del Rey residents aged 25 and older had earned a four-year degree by 2000, an average figure for both the city and the county.

The schools within Del Rey are as follows:

  • Culver City Christian School, private elementary, 11312 Washington Boulevard
  • Stoner Avenue Elementary School, LAUSD, 11735 Braddock Drive
  • ICEF Vista Elementary Academy, charter school, 4471 Inglewood Boulevard
  • Braddock Drive Elementary School, LAUSD, 4711 Inglewood Boulevard
  • Short Avenue Elementary School, LAUSD, 12814 Maxella Avenue
  • Marina del Rey Middle School, LAUSD, 12500 Braddock Drive
  • Ocean Charter School, charter elementary, 12606 Culver Boulevard
  • Goethe International Charter School, charter elementary, 12500 Braddock Drive

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Homes for sale in Cheviot Hills (Los Angeles), CA

Homes, condos and land for sale and rent in Cheviot Hills, LA

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Cheviot Hills is an affluent neighborhood of single-family homes on the Westside of the city of Los Angeles, California.
Founded in 1924, the neighborhood has been the filming location of countless movies and television shows due to its convenient location between Fox Studios and Sony Studios. The neighborhood has also long been home to many actors, television personalities, and studio executives.
Cheviot Hills features the Cheviot Hills Park, the Cheviot Hills Recreation Center, the Cheviot Hills Tennis Courts, and Rancho Park Golf Course. The park and recreation center have a community room which has a capacity of 80 to 100 people. In addition they have an auditorium, barbecue pits, a lighted baseball diamond, an unlighted baseball diamond, lighted indoor basketball courts, lighted outdoor basketball courts, a children’s play area, an indoor gymnasium without weights, picnic tables, and lighted volleyball courts. The Cheviot Hills Tennis Courts consists of fourteen lighted tennis courts. The Cheviot Hills Pool is an outdoor unheated seasonal pool in Cheviot Hills.
Cheviot Hills in 1928. This house was designed by Eugene R. Ward and named “Terrace View” by the builder. It was home to Agnes Moorehead in the 1940s and 1950s. (Modern day photo featured earlier in this article)
Almost all of today’s Cheviot Hills was within the Spanish land grant known as Rancho Rincon de los Bueyes. Largely undeveloped until the 1920s, initial construction in the residential section west of Motor Avenue dates to the 1920s. From the 1920s to 1953, the streetcar line known as the Santa Monica Air Line of the Pacific Electric Railway ran along the southern edge of Cheviot Hills and provided passenger service between Cheviot Hills, downtown Los Angeles, and downtown Santa Monica. Much of the neighborhood east of Motor Avenue and south of Forrester Drive was built on the site of the former California Country Club, and the residences date to the early 1950s. The neighborhood features several homes by prominent architects, such as the Strauss-Lewis House by Raphael Soriano and the Harry Culver Estate, designed by Wallace Neff.
The 2000 U.S. census counted 6,945 residents in the 1.54-square-mile Cheviot Hills neighborhood—an average of 4,520 people per square mile, among the lowest densities for the city; The acreage include the open areas of the Cheviot Hills Park, the Rancho Park Golf Course and Hillcrest Country Club. in 2008, the city estimated that the population had increased to 7,303. The median age for residents was 42, older than the city at large; the percentages of residents aged 50 to 64 were among the county’s highest.
The neighborhood was considered “not especially diverse” ethnically, with a high percentage of white people. The breakdown was whites, 78.8%; Latinos, 8.3%; Asians, 9.1%, blacks, 1.3%; and others, 2.5%. Japan (8.8%) and Mexico (7.7%) were the most common places of birth for the 20.8% of the residents who were born abroad—considered a low figure for Los Angeles.
The median yearly household income in 2008 dollars was $111,813, a high figure for Los Angeles, and the percentage of households earning $125,000 and up was considered high for the county. The average household size of 2.2 people was low for both the city and the county. Renters occupied 35.7% of the housing stock and house- or apartment owners held 64.3%.
The percentages of veterans who served during World War II or the Korean War were among the county’s highest.
According to the Mapping L.A. project of the Los Angeles Times, Cheviot Hills is flanked on the north by Century City, on the east by Beverlywood and Castle Heights, on the south by Palms, on the west by Rancho Park and on the northwest by West Los Angeles.
Cheviot Hills’s street and other borders are: Rancho Park Golf Course and Hillcrest Country Club to the northwest; Anchor Avenue and Club Drive to the east; and Manning Avenue to the southwest.
Sixty percent of Cheviot Hills residents aged 25 and older had earned a four-year degree by 2000, a high figure for both the city and the county. The percentages of residents of that age with a bachelor’s degree or a master’s degree were also considered high for the county.
The schools near Cheviot Hills are as follows:
Overland Avenue Elementary School, LAUSD, 10650 Ashby Avenue
Vista School, private K–12, 3200 Motor Avenue
Lycée Français de Los Angeles Kabbaz High School

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Homes for sale in Brentwood (Los Angeles), CA

Homes, condos and land for sale and rent in Brentwood, LA

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Brentwood is an affluent neighborhood in the Westside of Los Angeles, California. It is the home of seven private and two public schools.
Originally part of a Mexican land grant, the neighborhood began its modern development in the 1880s and hosted part of the pentathlon in the 1932 Summer Olympics. It was the site of the 1994 O. J. Simpson murder case and of a disastrous fire in 1961.
Brentwood was part of the Rancho San Vicente y Santa Monica, a Mexican land-grant ranch sold off in pieces by the Sepúlveda family after the Mexican-American War.
Modern development began after the establishment of the 600-acre (2.4 km2) Pacific Branch of the National Home for Disabled Soldiers and Sailors in the 1880s. A small community sprang up outside that facility’s west gate, taking on the name Westgate. Annexed by the City of Los Angeles on June 14, 1916, Westgate’s 49 square miles (130 km2) included large parts of what is now the Pacific Palisades and a small portion of today’s Bel-Air. Westgate Avenue is one of the last reminders of that namesake.
The 2000 U.S. census counted 31,344 residents in the 15.22-square-mile Brentwood neighborhood—or 2,059 people per square mile, among the lowest population densities for the city and the county. In 2008, the city estimated that the population had increased to 33,312. In 2000 the median age for residents was 35, which was old for city and county neighborhoods. The percentages of residents aged 50 and older were among the county’s highest.

The racial breakdown is whites, 84.2%; Asians, 6.5%; Latinos, 4.5%; blacks, 1.2%; and others, 3.6%. Iran (27.2%) and the United Kingdom (4.8%) were the most common places of birth for the 21.1% of the residents who were born abroad—which was a low percentage for Los Angeles as a whole.
The median yearly household income in 2008 dollars was $112,927, considered high for the city and the county. Renters occupied 48.4% of the housing stock, and house- or apartment-owners held 51.6%. The average household size of two people was considered low for Los Angeles. The 5.7% of families headed by single parents was low for city and county neighborhoods.

The district is located at the base of the Santa Monica Mountains, bounded by the San Diego Freeway on the east, Wilshire Boulevard on the south, the Santa Monica city limits on the southwest, the border of Topanga State Park on the west and Mulholland Drive along the ridgeline of the mountains on the north.
As a member of a group of nearby neighborhoods that are affluent, it is known as one of the “Three Bs”, along with Beverly Hills and Bel Air.
A view of Wilshire Boulevard westbound, toward the ocean. Brentwood begins on the right-hand side of the street.
Brentwood, like nearby Santa Monica, has a temperate climate influenced by marine breezes off the Pacific Ocean. Residents frequently wake to a “marine layer,” a cover of clouds brought in at night which burns off by mid-morning. The topography is generally split into two characters, broadly divided by Sunset Boulevard: the area north of Sunset is defined by ridges and canyons of the Santa Monica Mountains; south of Sunset the area is hilly. The southern district features underground springs which bubble up into a small creek along “the Gully” near the Brentwood Country Club, and in the “Indian Springs” portion of the University High School campus, formerly the site of a Native American Tongva village.

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Homes for sale in Bel Air (Los Angeles), CA

Homes, condos and land for sale and rent in Bel Air, LA

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Bel Air, Bel-Air or Bel Air Estates is a neighborhood in Los Angeles, California.
The neighborhood, which lies across Sunset Boulevard from the University of California, Los Angeles, is the site of four private and two public pre-collegiate schools, as well as of the American Jewish University. Founded in 1923, the neighborhood has been the filming location or setting for numerous television shows.

The community was founded in 1923 by Alphonzo Bell. Bell owned farm property in Santa Fe Springs, California, where oil was discovered. He bought a large ranch with a home on what is now Bel Air Road. He subdivided and developed the property with large residential lots. He also built the Bel-Air Beach Club in Santa Monica and the Bel-Air Country Club. His wife chose Italian names for the streets. She also founded the Bel-Air Garden Club in 1931.
Together with Beverly Hills and Holmby Hills, Bel Air forms the Platinum Triangle of Los Angeles neighborhoods.

The 2000 U.S. census counted 7,691 residents in the 6.37-square-mile (16.5 km2) Bel Air neighborhood; with 1,207 per square mile (466/km2) it has among the lowest population densities for the city and the county. In 2008, the city estimated that the population had increased to 8,253.
In 2000 the median age for residents was 46, which was high for city and county neighborhoods. The percentages of residents aged 50 and older was among the county’s highest. The median yearly household income in 2008 dollars was $207,938, the highest figure for any neighborhood or city in Los Angeles County. Renters occupied 14.5% of the housing stock, and house- or apartment-owners held 85.5%. The average household size of 2.4 people was considered typical for Los Angeles.
The 4.1% of families headed by single parents was considered low for city and county neighborhoods. The percentages of married people in Bel Air were among the county’s highest—66.0% for men and 65.7% for women. There were 808 veterans, or 12.9% of the population.
The neighborhood was considered “not especially diverse” ethnically within Los Angeles, with a relatively high percentage of white people. The breakdown was whites, 83.0%; Asians, 8.2%; Latinos, 4.6%; blacks, 0.9%; and others, 3.2%. Iran (26.1%) and South Africa (8.2%) were the most common places of birth for the 24.1% of the residents who were born abroad—which was an average percentage for Los Angeles as a whole.

Bel Air is situated about 12 miles (19 km) west of Downtown Los Angeles and includes some of the foothills of the Santa Monica Mountains. It lies across Sunset Boulevard from the northern edge of the main campus of the University of California, Los Angeles. At the heart of the community sits the Bel-Air Country Club and the Hotel Bel-Air.
Along with Beverly Hills and the Los Angeles community of Brentwood, it is one of the “Three Bs”, a wealthy area in the Los Angeles Westside.
Almost two-thirds (66.1%) of Bel Air residents aged 25 and older had earned a four-year degree by 2000, a high percentage for the city and the county. The percentages of residents in that age range with a bachelor’s degree or greater were high for the county. The community is within the Los Angeles Unified School District. The area is within Board District 4. As of 2009, Steve Zimmer represented the district.

The schools within Bel Air are as follows:

Public
Roscomare Road Elementary School, 2325 Roscomare Road
Community Magnet Charter Elementary School, 11301 Bellagio Road. Because the school’s point-based admissions system does not favor area residents, children living in Bel Air generally do not attend the school. It is located in the former Bellagio Road School campus.
Roscomare Road and Warner Avenue Elementary School in Westwood are the zoned elementary schools serving Bel Air. Bel Air is within the attendance boundaries of Emerson Middle School in Westwood and University High School, West Los Angeles.

In April 1983 an advisory committee of the LAUSD recommended closing eight LAUSD schools, including Bellagio Road School. The committee did not target Fairburn Avenue School in Westwood, as a way of allowing it to preserve its ethnic balance, and so it can take children from Bellagio Road in the event that it closed. In August 1983 the board publicly considered closing Bellagio, which had 240 students at the time. The school’s enrollment had been decreasing. In May 1983 the board voted to keep the school open. In February 1984, after the composition of the board had changed, the board voted to close the Bellagio Road School.
Bel Air previously housed the Bellagio Road Newcomer School, a 3rd-8th grade school for newly arrived immigrants. In 2002 it had 390 students from Armenia, China, El Salvador, Guatemala, Korea, Russia, and other countries. This program was housed in the former Bellagio Road school.

Private
Marymount High School, 10643 Sunset Boulevard
Stephen S. Wise Temple Elementary School/Milken Community Schools, K–12, 15500 Stephen S. Wise Drive
John Thomas Dye School, K–6, 11414 Chalon Road
The Mirman School
Westland School, 16200 Mulholland Drive, was founded in 1949. It moved to its current location in 1965, becoming the first school to locate in what has now developed into a major ‘institutional corridor’ in the area of the Sepulveda Pass.

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